Clinical Trials & Research

New UMBC-led research in Frontiers in Microbiology suggests that viruses are using information from their environment to “decide” when to sit tight inside their hosts and when to multiply and burst out, killing the host cell. The work has implications for antiviral drug development. A virus’s ability to sense its environment, including elements produced by
0 Comments
Why are certain body parts more prone to skin diseases than others? Two new UC Davis Health studies explored how differences in skin composition may lead to dermatological conditions, such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. “Skin does not have a uniform composition throughout the body,” said Emanual Maverakis, professor of dermatology, molecular medical microbiology at
0 Comments
Researchers at Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a gene marker that may lead to a more effective, precision treatment for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The researcher’s findings are published in Nature Cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most lethal cancers.” Dr. Zhenkun Lou, Paper’s Senior Author Dr. Lou says while Poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase
0 Comments
Bronx county has the country’s fifth-highest rate of HIV diagnosis-;but the lowest rate in New York State for use of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), medications that are extremely effective in preventing HIV infection. Physician-researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System have received a five-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Institutes
0 Comments
Scientists have shown that high-fat diets can cause rapid changes in the bone marrow of mice, driving the production of inflammatory immune cells, according to findings published today in eLife. The results may help explain how high-fat diets trigger inflammation, which can contribute to the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and other complications
0 Comments
Early intervention with rituximab, a drug used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), can reduce the risk of deterioration in myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease that causes loss of muscle control. This is according to a randomized clinical study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and published in the journal JAMA Neurology.
0 Comments
Mitochondria are compartments – so-called “organelles” — in our cells that provide the chemical energy supply we need to move, think, and live. Chloroplasts are organelles in plants and algae that capture sunlight and perform photosynthesis. At a first glance, they might look worlds apart. But an international team of researchers, led by the University
0 Comments
A new publishing platform for open access biomedical research has launched. LSHTM Press will provide an open access platform to publish peer-reviewed research and high-quality educational resources, in accordance with the LSHTM mission to improve health and health equity in the UK and worldwide. The Press is a new initiative, developed in response to the
0 Comments
An international research consortium led by UC San Francisco scientists has shown significant differences between the gut bacteria profiles of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy individuals, as well as between MS patients receiving different drug treatments. While some of these changes had been reported before, most are reported for the first time. The group
0 Comments
Achieving a good efficacy of chemotherapy is one of the major challenges still unresolved in oncological patients. The main limitation to the efficacy of chemotherapy is the multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype, a multiple cross-resistance towards different anticancer drugs. MDR solid tumors represent a serious clinical problem. Until now, there is only fragmented knowledge on biomarkers and
0 Comments
Frailty is defined as reduced physiological reserve and ability to cope with acute stresses. Up to half of adults over the age of 85 live with frailty and thus, preventative measures are greatly needed. Investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a founding member of the Mass General Brigham healthcare system, were interested in examining whether
0 Comments
A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) finds that there is a widening gap in diabetes-related mortality between urban and rural areas in the USA, and that reductions in mortality rates seen predominantly in urban areas have been mainly limited to female and older
0 Comments
Weill Cornell Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $5 million grant from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to establish a new multi-institutional center for tuberculosis (TB) research and training the next generation of TB investigators. The New York Tri-Institutional TB Research Advancement Center (TRAC) will
0 Comments
Chlamydia, the leading cause of sexually transmitted bacterial infections, evades detection and elimination inside human cells by use of a cloaking device. But Duke University researchers have grasped the hem of that invisibility cloak and now hope they can pull it apart. To enter the cell and peacefully reproduce, many pathogenic bacteria, including Chlamydia, cloak
0 Comments
A team of researchers from the IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) has designed in silico “molecular probes” able to track the progress of a protein that misbehaves in different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD). The probes can be used to study the behavior of the
0 Comments
The immune cells of patients who received hospital care for COVID-19 early in the pandemic were still affected six months later. A study conducted by researchers at Linköping University suggests that infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus leaves significant effects long after the patient is symptom-free. The results have been published in Frontiers in Immunology. “We
0 Comments
Sep 7 2022 Psychological distress, including depression, anxiety, worry, perceived stress, and loneliness, before COVID-19 infection was associated with an increased risk of long COVID, according to researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The increased risk was independent of smoking, asthma, and other health behaviors or physical health conditions. “We were surprised
0 Comments