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Automated alerts to aid clinical decision-making are designed with the best of intentions but can be easy to ignore or overlook. But a randomized trial testing such electronic alerts or “nudges” for promoting statin prescribing may have identified a few design features that help their success, researchers say. In the trial’s primary finding, for example,
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A new study supports the hypothesis that changes in levels of amyloid and tau occur many years before the emergence of clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). “Our results confirm accelerated biomarker changes during preclinical AD and highlight the important role of amyloid levels in tau accelerations,” the investigators note. “These data may suggest that
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“Science is not done on Rumble.” — Katrine Wallace, PhD, of the University of Illinois in Chicago, commenting on the anti-vaccine documentary “Died Suddenly” that premiered on Twitter and Rumble earlier this month. “COVID or not, most physicians go to work even if they’re not feeling 100 percent.” — Joel Zivot, MD, of Emory University
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Because of high out-of-pocket costs of new-to-market neurologic drugs that are of similar benefit as older agents, only a small percentage of patients with neurologic disorders have access to these cutting-edge medications, new research shows. “Our study of people with neurologic conditions found fewer than 20% were being treated with new medications,” study author Brian
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Dr Marc Tessier-Lavigne Stanford University has launched a formal investigation into its own president, neuroscientist Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, for alleged research misconduct pertaining to five scientific articles on which he was lead or coauthor. Stanford’s Board of Trustees is leading the investigation. The university’s student newspaper, the Stanford Daily, broke the news of the investigation
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The 24-hour news cycle is just as important to medicine as it is to politics, finance, or sports. At MedPage Today, new information is posted daily, but keeping up can be a challenge. As an aid for our readers, here is a 10-question quiz based on the news of the week. Topics include glasses as
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An online yoga program appears to be effective, feasible, and safe for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a new report. Participants reported a decrease in IBS-related symptoms and improvements in quality of life, fatigue, and perceived stress. “IBS affects upwards of 15%-20% of the North American population, and despite our advances in
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As the U.S. enters the holiday season, there is fear that the flu situation could get more alarming in the coming weeks.  Based on the latest data from the Health and Human Services Department, flu hospitalizations have increased by nearly 30% in a week. More than 11,200 people were hospitalized due to the flu virus
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. COVID-19 vaccines retained the ability to prevent deaths from COVID-19 in children and adolescents regardless of the dominant circulating variant, in a new study. The vaccine’s effectiveness against infection in the short term has been established, as has the waning effectiveness
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Scientists have created a machine that will listen to your farts, pee, and poop. Yes, that’s right. The machine will recognize and analyze the sound of each bathroom-related activity. The scientists have cleverly named the machine Synthetic Human Acoustic Reproduction Testing machine (S.H.A.R.T.). It is a mechanical device fitted with pumps, nozzles, and tubes. The
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The debate about a possible link between food allergy (FA) and pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continues, and more, better-designed research is needed, a position paper by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology reports. The report offers consensus-based recommendations and a graphical decision pathway to guide providers through assessing and treating food allergy-related
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An insightful study analyzing what contributes to the sharpness of mind in old age has found evolutionary hints. The study, which was published in the peer-reviewed Chinese journal Science Bulletin, found that more developed frontal lobes were associated with sharp minds in some old people. The reason behind this occurrence may be attributed to natural
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With big pieces of COVID-19 legislation mostly in Congress’s rearview mirror, legislators will be turning their attention to other health-related matters, including substance abuse, telehealth, and lots of regulatory oversight, several experts said during an online briefing sponsored by the Alliance for Health Policy. “The [current] Congress is probably the last Congress likely to do
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There has been no ebb in the flurry of respiratory illnesses infecting America’s youngest children. More pediatric wards across the country are announcing crises as beds reach capacity, the pediatric death toll jumped significantly in the past week, and sometimes children are being infected with more than one virus at a time. In Oregon, for
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